American Journal of Agriculture https://ajpojournals.org/journals/index.php/AJA <p>The American Journal of Agriculture is a monthly journal that publishes original and innovative research on various aspects of agricultural sciences. The journal aims to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration and communication among researchers, practitioners, and policy makers. The journal has a high-quality and transparent peer review process, and is indexed by several reputable databases. The journal respects the authors' intellectual property rights and ethical standards.</p> en-US <p>Authors retain copyright and grant the journal right of first publication with the work simultaneously licensed under a <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/">Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 License</a> that allows others to share the work with an acknowledgment of the work’s authorship and initial publication in this journal.</p> journals@ajpojournals.org (Journal Admin) Journals@ajpojournals.org (Chief Editor) Sat, 03 Feb 2024 11:42:10 +0300 OJS 3.2.1.1 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Effects of Different Fertilizer Types on Plant Growth https://ajpojournals.org/journals/index.php/AJA/article/view/1759 <p><strong>Purpose:</strong> The aim of the study was to assess the effects of different fertilizer types on plant growth in Kenya.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> This study adopted a desk methodology. A desk study research design is commonly known as secondary data collection. This is basically collecting data from existing resources preferably because of its low cost advantage as compared to a field research. Our current study looked into already published studies and reports as the data was easily accessed through online journals and libraries.</p> <p><strong>Findings:</strong> Research on fertilizer effects in Kenya emphasizes the need for customized fertilizer applications tailored to specific crop needs and local soil conditions. Nutrient balance and sustainable soil management are crucial for optimizing plant growth. Environmentally friendly fertilizers and sustainable practices should be promoted to mitigate environmental impacts. Policymakers can use these findings to develop policies that support precision agriculture, resource-efficient farming, and region-specific fertilizer strategies for enhanced agricultural productivity and sustainability in Kenya.</p> <p><strong>Implications to Theory, Practice and Policy:</strong>&nbsp; Liebig's law of the minimum, the law of diminishing returns and the law of minimum photosynthesis may be use to anchor future studies on assessing the effects of different fertilizer types on plant growth in Kenya. The practical implications of this research are substantial. Customized fertilizer applications, as recommended, empower farmers to optimize resource use, improve crop health, and enhance marketability. Policymakers can leverage the research findings in the development of policies that support sustainable agriculture, precision farming, and regional adaptation.</p> John Mwangi Copyright (c) 2024 John Mwangi http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://ajpojournals.org/journals/index.php/AJA/article/view/1759 Sat, 03 Feb 2024 00:00:00 +0300 Influence of Temperature Variations on Grapevine Phenology https://ajpojournals.org/journals/index.php/AJA/article/view/1757 <p><strong>Purpose:</strong> The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of temperature variations on grapevine phenology.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> This study adopted a desk methodology. A desk study research design is commonly known as secondary data collection. This is basically collecting data from existing resources preferably because of its low cost advantage as compared to a field research. Our current study looked into already published studies and reports as the data was easily accessed through online journals and libraries.</p> <p><strong>Findings:</strong> Temperature variations strongly impact grapevine phenology, with warmer conditions advancing growth stages and cooler temperatures causing delays. This has direct consequences for grape quality and wine production, emphasizing the importance of temperature monitoring for vineyard management and adapting to climate changes.</p> <p><strong>Implications to Theory, Practice and Policy:</strong> Phenological response theory, climate change theory and bioclimatic model theory may be used to anchor future studies on analyzing the influence of temperature variations on grapevine phenology. Develop and disseminate practical guidelines for vineyard managers and growers to adapt to temperature variations effectively. Advocate for policies that support climate-resilient viticulture practices. Encourage government agencies to incentivize research, development, and adoption of adaptive strategies within the wine industry.</p> Bonface Kimani Copyright (c) 2024 Bonface Kimani http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://ajpojournals.org/journals/index.php/AJA/article/view/1757 Sat, 03 Feb 2024 00:00:00 +0300 Impact of Soil Moisture Levels on Crop Yields in Kenya https://ajpojournals.org/journals/index.php/AJA/article/view/1755 <p><strong>Purpose:</strong> The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of soil moisture levels on crop yields in Kenya.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> This study adopted a desk methodology. A desk study research design is commonly known as secondary data collection. This is basically collecting data from existing resources preferably because of its low cost advantage as compared to a field research. Our current study looked into already published studies and reports as the data was easily accessed through online journals and libraries.</p> <p><strong>Findings:</strong> In Kenya, maintaining soil moisture levels between 60-70% is crucial for optimal crop yields, especially for staple crops like maize. Regional variations exist due to different climates and soil types. Climate change poses challenges with irregular rainfall patterns, affecting soil moisture and crop productivity. Technology adoption, policies promoting climate-resilient agriculture, and farmer education are essential for sustainable farming and food security in Kenya.</p> <p><strong>Implications to Theory, Practice and Policy:</strong>&nbsp; water stress theory, field capacity and permanent wilting point and hydraulic redistribution theory may be use to anchor future studies on the impact of soil moisture levels on crop yields in Kenya. Agricultural practitioners should adopt crop-specific soil moisture management strategies based on empirical findings. Governments and policymakers should develop climate-resilient agricultural policies that account for changing soil moisture patterns.</p> Bonface Kimani Copyright (c) 2024 Bonface Kimani http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://ajpojournals.org/journals/index.php/AJA/article/view/1755 Sat, 03 Feb 2024 00:00:00 +0300 Role of Crop Rotation Practices on Soil Health https://ajpojournals.org/journals/index.php/AJA/article/view/1758 <p><strong>Purpose:</strong> The aim of the study was to examine the role of crop rotation practices on soil health in Kenya.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> This study adopted a desk methodology. A desk study research design is commonly known as secondary data collection. This is basically collecting data from existing resources preferably because of its low cost advantage as compared to a field research. Our current study looked into already published studies and reports as the data was easily accessed through online journals and libraries.</p> <p><strong>Findings:</strong> Crop rotation enhances soil health by diversifying crops, improving nutrient balance, suppressing diseases, enhancing soil structure, and aiding in weed control. This practice promotes biodiversity, supports nutrient cycling, and contributes to sustainable agriculture while offering economic advantages through increased yields and reduced input costs. Overall, crop rotation plays a vital role in maintaining and improving the long-term health of agricultural soils.</p> <p><strong>Implications to Theory, Practice and Policy:</strong>&nbsp; Liebig's law of the minimum, Jensen's theory of crop rotation benefits and Gliessman's agroecological principles may be use to anchor future studies on examining the role of crop rotation practices on soil health in Kenya. Develop extension programs and educational materials to disseminate knowledge about the benefits of crop rotation and provide practical guidance on implementing diverse rotation systems. Governments and agricultural agencies can establish incentive programs, such as subsidies or tax incentives, to encourage farmers to adopt crop rotation practices.</p> John Mwangi Copyright (c) 2024 John Mwangi http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://ajpojournals.org/journals/index.php/AJA/article/view/1758 Sat, 03 Feb 2024 00:00:00 +0300 Relationship between Pesticide Usage and Bee Population Decline in Kenya https://ajpojournals.org/journals/index.php/AJA/article/view/1756 <p><strong>Purpose:</strong> The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between pesticide usage and bee population decline in Kenya.</p> <p><strong>Methodology:</strong> This study adopted a desk methodology. A desk study research design is commonly known as secondary data collection. This is basically collecting data from existing resources preferably because of its low cost advantage as compared to a field research. Our current study looked into already published studies and reports as the data was easily accessed through online journals and libraries.</p> <p><strong>Findings:</strong> Research in Kenya indicates a significant correlation between pesticide usage, particularly neonicotinoids and pyrethroids, and declining bee populations. These pesticides negatively affect bee health, foraging, and reproduction. This poses concerns for agriculture and food security. Sustainable agricultural practices and regulatory measures are needed to protect bee populations and pollination services in Kenya.</p> <p><strong>Implications to Theory, Practice and Policy:</strong>&nbsp; Ecotoxicology theory, population dynamics theory and risk assessment theory may be use to anchor future studies on the relationship between pesticide usage and bee population decline in Kenya. Encourage the adoption of sustainable farming practices, including Integrated Pest Management (IPM), which can reduce pesticide usage while maintaining crop yields. Advocate for stricter regulations on pesticide usage, particularly neonicotinoids, and support the implementation of bans or restrictions in regions where the risks to bee populations are substantiated.</p> John Mwangi Copyright (c) 2024 John Mwangi http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 https://ajpojournals.org/journals/index.php/AJA/article/view/1756 Sat, 03 Feb 2024 00:00:00 +0300